Ansty Down is the final section of a long, rounded ridge of chalk, some 300 feet (100 m) high, which runs from Salisbury in the east to Donhead St Andrew in the west. A track runs all along the top of the ridge. It is an ancient way, used by Neolithic people. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the track was a coach and turnpike road from Salisbury to Shaftesbury.

The five walks that form this series were taken between December 2003 and October 2004. The photographs were made in the course of a single walk or two walks on consecutive days.
© 2022 Michael Marten

Ansty Down, December

Ansty Down is the final section of a long, rounded ridge of chalk, some 300 feet (100 m) high, which runs from Salisbury in the east to Donhead St Andrew in the west. A track runs all along the top of the ridge. It is an ancient way, used by Neolithic people. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the track was a coach and turnpike road from Salisbury to Shaftesbury.

The five walks that form this series were taken between December 2003 and October 2004. The photographs were made in the course of a single walk or two walks on consecutive days.